Mirza Ghulam Ahmad Qadyani claimed to “Self planted Plant by British Government”

MGA and his entire family were above the law in British India, that much is for sure. MGA never lost any court case, even when he was clearly guilty, the British government would not allow it, the reason was because of MGA’s father and family, since they were loyal insiders of the British, they turned on the Sikhs for the British in 1848-1849 and helped the British kill many Indian soldiers who rebelled against the British government in 1857. By 1897-98, in MGA’s book, “Kitab ul Barriyya” in english as “The Acquittal”, MGA admits to being a seed of British colonialism. The quotes are in the below. The Qadiani-Ahmadi have never translated this book into english, its been over 120+ years, however, the Lahori-Ahmadi’s have done a partial translation and have purposely not translated this quote. Thus, in the below, we have re-produced an old reference to RK where this reference should be. It should be noted, in 1900-1901, MGA finally officially claimed prophethood, and he abrogated Jihad for the benefit of colonialism.

Transliteration

The quote
Kitab-ul-Bariyah, Roohani Khazain vol 13 p.350

“”I am the ‘Self-implanted-Plant’ of the British Government. “Government should take great care regarding this ‘Self-implanted-Plant’ . . . . .should instruct its officers to treat ME and MY JAMA’AT with special kindness and favours. Our family has never hesitated in shedding their blood in the way of British Rulers and did not stop from laying down their lives neither do they hesitate now.” …..”From my early age till now when I am 65 years of age, I have been engaged , with my pen and tongue, in an important task to turn the hearts of Muslims towards the true love & Goodwill & sympathy for the British Government and to obliterate the idea of Jehad from the hearts of stupid (Muslims).”

An additional quote from the same book
“I come from a family which is out and out loyal to this government. My father, Mir Ghulam Murtaza, who was considered its well-wisher, used to be granted a chair in the Governor’s Darbar (cabinet) and has been mentioned by Mr. Griffin in his ‘History of the Princes of Punjab‘. In 1857, he helped the British government beyond his means, that is he procured fifty (50) cavaliers and horses right during the time of the mutiny. He was considered by the government to be its loyal supporter and well-wisher. A number of testimonials of appreciation received by him from the officers have unfortunately been lost. Copies of three of them, however, which had been published a long time ago, are reproduced in the margin (in English). Then, after the death of my grandfather, my elder brother Mirza Ghulam Qadir remained occupied with service to the government and when the evil-doers encountered the forces of the British government on the highway of Tanmmun, he participated in the battle on the side of the British Government (under General Nicholson he killed several freedom fighters).  At the time of the death of my father and brother, I was sitting in the sidelines; but, since then, I have been helping the British for seventeen years with my pen.”
(Kitab-ul-Barriah, Roohany Khazaen, Vol. 13, P. 4, 5, 6, 7;

Another quote
“The majority of people who have joined my sect are those who are either holding eminent posts with the British Court, or the goodly rich men, their servants and friends or businessmen, lawyers or those educated in the modern way or such famous scholars, servants and noblemen who have either served the British Government in the past or are serving it at present or their relations or friends who accepted the influence of their elders and the weekly holders of the office of the caretakers of some religious orders. In short, this is a party which is the protege of the British Government from whom it has earned good name and who is worthy of the Government’s favors. Or it consists of people who are related to me or are among my servants.”(Poster dated Feb. 24, 1897; Tabligh-e-Risalat, Vol. 7, P. 18, recorded by Qasim Ali Qadiani)

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